Top 5 Best Hunting Dogs For Hunters

Shares

Ever since time immemorial dogs have always been man’s best friend and partner. In fact, the very first dogs that humans bred were hunting dog breeds to aid them in the hunt for animals used as food. Dog hunting is a winning team during a hunt due to the partnership of human and dog. Both of them gain benefits from the arrangement. Today the hunting dog breed has many variations of the animal thanks to centuries of breeding, and though they are still hunting dogs, they are also companion pets.
Hunters and dog lovers each has their favorite dog for hunting. Here are some of the top 5 hunting dog breeds that are the favorite dog of hunters and dog lovers:

5. American Foxhound

American Fox Hound - Hunting Dog Breeds

Country of Origin: United States
Height: 65–75 pounds (29-34kg)
Weight: 21–25 inches (53-64cm)
Price: $400 – $550 USD

In 1650 the Englishman, Robert Brooke brought with his hunting dogs from England to North America’s Crown Colony. The dog pack he brought with him would become the foundation for several types of American Hounds. Three centuries later George Washington owned several of Brooke’s hunting dog breeds. Washington bred the dogs with French hounds which in turn helped developed the modern-day American Foxhound. The American Foxhound hunting dog breed was as a fox hunter by the hunting sport-loving landed gentry. The dog is bred to have good speed as well as stamina. The dog can also be trained to hunt other game animals besides foxes and will practically chase the intended target. Currently, there are several strains of the American Foxhound that all look different from each other, but they are still considered the same dog breed. The dog makes for a suitable pet due to its sweet and docile though they can be shy around unfamiliar people. It is advisable that the dog should not live in a city setting due to its loud musical howl that everyone can hear for miles.

In 1650 the Englishman, Robert Brooke brought with his hunting dogs from England to North America’s Crown Colony. The dog pack he brought with him would become the foundation for several types of American Hounds. Three centuries later George Washington owned several of Brooke’s hunting dog breeds. Washington bred the dogs with French hounds which in turn helped developed the modern-day American Foxhound. The American Foxhound hunting dog breed was as a fox hunter by the hunting sport-loving landed gentry. The dog is bred to have good speed as well as stamina. The dog can also be trained to hunt other game animals besides foxes and will practically chase the intended target. Currently, there are several strains of the American Foxhound that all look different from each other, but they are still considered the same dog breed. The dog makes for a suitable pet due to its sweet and docile though they can be shy around unfamiliar people. It is advisable that the dog should not live in a city setting due to its loud musical howl that everyone can hear for miles.

4. Beagle

Best Dog For Hunting - Beagle Breed

Country of Origin: England
Height: 13-16 in (33-41 cm)
Weight: 22–25 lb (10–11 kg)
Price: $400 – $1200 USD

In the 5th century, BC here is a mention of hunting dogs that look similar to the modern Beagle in Ancient Greece. However, it is during the 11th century that the foundation of the Beagle bloodline was made. The Talbot hound that William the Conqueror brought to England is believed to be the ancestor of today’s Beagle hunting dog breeds. The term Beagle is a generic description that was used in the Middle Ages for a variety of smaller hounds. It was only in the late 1901s that the standards for Beagles were drawn up. The Beagle was developed as a hunting dog during the 18th century, and its primary purpose was to hunt rabbit and hare. The US in the 1840s saw an export of this dog in its shores and by the 20th century, the breed can now be found worldwide.
The Beagle almost resembles a miniature Foxhound though its head is broader and has a shorter muzzle. Its legs are shorter in proportion compared to its body. The sense of smell of the dog is it’s the best trait compared to other hunting dog breeds. This dog hunting for prey will easily find its target quickly making it one the favorite dogs for hunting.
The dog is gentle and has an even temper. They also get along with children and other dogs hence their popularity as family pets. They need a regular exercise to prevent them gaining too much weight which is very prone to happen in Beagles.

3. Bloodhound

BloodHound - Best dog for Hunting

Country of Origin: Belgium, France, and the United Kingdom
Height: 64–72 cm (25–28 in)
Weight: 46–54 kg (101–119 lb)
Price: $500 – $1200 USD

It’s hard to pinpoint the Bloodhounds progenitors which some would say was the St. Hubert dog. Others contend that the invading Normans from mainland Europe bought over these hounds to England. Regardless of its uncertain origins, the Bloodhound as a hunting dog performs its purpose well.
When compared to other hunting dog breeds the Bloodhound has a keen sense of smell that is considered extraordinary. The Bloodhound was originally meant for hunting wild boar and deer, but it also had the expertise to track humans thanks to its sense of smell that can discern the scent of a human over long distances. Today the breed is used to track missing people, escaped prisoners and lost pets making it a favorite dog hunting breed for law as well as police enforcement groups.
Because of its nature, the Bloodhound has a tenacious tracking instinct. The dog is also gentle, even-tempered and affectionate though it can be tireless when tracking its target. They are suitable as family pets, but they still need supervision when interacting with children.

4. Labrador Retriever

Yellow Labrador For Best Hunting Dogs

Country of origin: The United Kingdom & Canada
Height: 56–56 cm (22–22 in)
Weight: 29–36 kg (65–80 lb)
Price: US – $800 to $1200
UK – £650 to £850

The ancestor of the Labrador hunting dog was the St. John’s water dog that lived in Newfoundland, Canada. The St. John’s water dog has been extinct since the 1980s, but it has left behind its Retriever dog descendants which include the Labrador. The Labrador is the top favorite due to its other uses besides hunting. The breed has worked as an eye-seeing dog, therapy dog, law enforcement dog and military dog. The dog’s impressive resume along with its outgoing, kind and tractable nature makes it a highly prized dog. As a gun dog, it excels in waterfowl hunting since it tracks and retrieves the bird for its master.
There are two varieties of this breed. The Conformation type which is medium sized with short, full stocky face and calm nature. The Field type is lanky, long nose, thin headed and has long legs.

5. Pointer

English Pointer One of the Best Dog Hunters

Country of Origin: England
Height: 25–28 in (60–70 cm)
Weight: 45-75 lbs (20-34 kg)
Price: $400 – $3500 USD

There is a lot of debate when it comes to the history of the Pointer much like other hunting dog breeds. As far as 1650 there are records of Pointers, and other records state that its bloodline founders were brought from mainland Europe to England. The modern-day Pointer has four breeds as their ancestors. Bull Terriers, Greyhounds, Bloodhounds and Foxhounds breeds were cross-bred to produce the Pointer Breed. The dog breed was eventually imported to the US in 1876, and the first modern Pointer American Kennel was established in 1936.
Southern United States is one place in the US where this hunting dog breed is prevalent. It is often referred as a “bird dog” due to its skill in pointing out upland game birds. The Pointer is a member of the hunting dog breeds, but it doesn’t stop the dog from becoming an excellent house pet. Temperamentally they are loyal, intelligent, affectionate, clean and has low-level of aggression. As long as the dog has enough exercise they can interact well with kids, other dogs, and other animals.

The members of the hunting dog breeds are a real man’s best friend and their supportive partner. Whether these dogs are used for hunting game or companion pets by their human owners, they will always remain a part of our society leading productive lives and help us humans in our everyday lives.